Thursday, 12 July 2018

JAGO STONE - THE AMERICAN CONNECTION - PART EIGHT

The post that follows first appeared - for the most part - as my July Mailchimp Newsletter. Some readers will have already seen it there, but many won't. Just out of interest, you might like to know that 34 subscribers so far have read the Newsletter this month. By comparison, a typical Jago - American Connection blog will have picked up around 250 views in the first three months. For those who are now familiar with this eighth American Connection I hope you enjoy it a second time - and for those who are coming to the story for the first time, I hope you share my sense of wonder at the ways and means of cyberspace detection. Here's the post: 

 

'The Residency at the Redwing Gallery in Penzance during June was very enjoyable for me and I hope interesting for the handfuls of people who attended the seven talks I gave. I have produced seven blog-posts in June to tell the stories of these Redwing gatherings in words and images.

If you know anyone you think might be interested in these mailings about 'Jago' do encourage them to follow the link to my website. Here it is:  www.robdonovan-author.co.uk/JagoStone-Biography.html

You can also use this page to access my Jago Stone blogs.

Copies of 'The Road to Corbyn' can be purchased at a discount using this link: www.robdonovan-author.co.uk/TheRoadToCorbyn.html.

Here are some details for Redwing:
 
1pm until 3pm
Opening Hours:
                       Monday 10:30 am - 4.30 pm
                       Tuesday 10:30 am - 4.30 pm
                       Wednesday 10:30 am - 4.30 pm
                       Thursday 10:30 am - 4.30 pm
                       Friday 10:30 am - 4:30 pm
                       Saturday 10:30 am - 4.30 pm



Looking back down the side-street to Market Jew Street


In the last couple of Newsletters, I have outlined my searches for a literary agent who could secure publication for 'Jago'. That activity still continues - but by now it is not difficult to read the runes. There are tens of thousands of authors out there chasing the dragon of mainstream publication and we are all 'commercial risks' until someone inside the system decides to take a chance. I expect to be 


exploring the range of self-publication options after we return from Greece in late September this year. I will advise you all further in the October Newsletter.

Meanwhile, let me tell you the story of American Connection Number Eight. As you will see, the tale is less than a week old:

On June 25, 2018, I got a Facebook message on my Jago webpage from Juliane Lindquist in the States - 'Hi there, my name is Julie and my family and I were friends of Jago years ago. My mother has an oil painting and several watercolors and knew his wife … it's nice to see his work like this! Just happened to run into this page on accident!!!'.

I replied and got this message by return:

'So nice to hear from you! My mother is quite the character and she and Jago were good friends for the 3 years we lived in England. We now live in Idaho and his paintings hang in both our households. I will give you her email address with a warning that she isn't very well versed in how to use computers and it may take awhile for her to respond. My Mom's name is Nancy and she will be thrilled to talk to you. She was actually almost thrown into jail as well because of Jago. It's a funny story I am sure she will tell you. Thanks so much! Julie.

'I'll be thrilled to listen to your mom/read her stories', I replied. 'Wow! A very exciting development. Can't wait for the Almost Jail story.'

Within a day, Julie had sent me these images that accompany this story. Her message began: 'These are the pictures my mom has. The oil painting was done in 1976. My mother had decided she didn't like a painting she had hanging over the couch. So Jago went back to his. Got his oils. And painted over the picture she had hanging there. Never taking it off the wall. Just kept jumping on and off the couch, painting. It's a picture of the Cotswolds.'


'We lived in Duns Tew for a year. My mother used to sing in the church. Two of the paintings are of Duns Tew. I am going to have to her write something up and then I will get it to you'.




I responded straightaway before going to bed and immediately picked up this message by return:
'Having lunch with my mom. She is thrilled. Says it's fine to use the pictures. Two of the watercolors are from Duns Tew and the oil and the other watercolor are the Cotswolds. Duns Tew is a small village about 5 miles from what used to be Upper Heyford Air Force Base. Maybe 20 miles outside of Oxford she says.' 









That's the story as far as it has unfolded. No doubt there will me more - and I will keep you up-to-date.

Yesterday, I had another 'decline' from a literary agent - 5 rejections to date from the 19 agents I have contacted in the last four months. Sophie wrote:

"Thank you for sending us a sample of your work to review and for your patience while we read it. We enjoyed your writing, but after extensive consideration, we do not feel that we are the right agency to represent your proposed material … We wish you all the best with the publication and success of your work. Many thanks."

There are worse ways to be told you're too much of a commercial risk.