Friday, 18 January 2019

JAGO STONE - NEW IMAGES IN HI-RES - PART TWO

In Part One, a few days ago, I promised readers hi-res images from American sources. Those images and their stories are below - but first a reminder for any new readers of the background to this post.

The biography of Jago Stone will be published as 'The Remarkable Life of Jago Stone' by Rob Donovan on October 1 this year. Unicorn PLG are my publishers. Their design team and I are working together to ensure that the book looks as good as it reads - and to this end I contacted recently all those who had sent me images of their Jago Stone paintings and which I then referenced and included as images within the text. Unicorn and I hoped that these contributors would respond and send me hi-res images of their Jago Stone art work which I could then add to the Dropbox to send to Unicorn. The higher the resolution, the finer the picture.

The response has been impressive. So many higher-resolution images have already arrived through cyber space; others have been promised. In this post, I focus on two of those who have gifted me hi-res images that will appear in the book - both American - and give you - the reader - the opportunity to see those paintings. Another taster for the book itself.

The Pue family home in Bicester, Oxfordshire - Jago Stone (1984)



In the order the American hi-res images came, first the story behind those from Jessica Raber, nee Pue. Jessica is an artist in Bloomington, Indiana - press here for a link https://raberarts.tumblr.com. She was five years old when Jago painted a watercolour of her parent's home in Bicester, Oxfordshire in 1984 during the time they were on tour, stationed

Tuesday, 15 January 2019

JAGO STONE - NEW IMAGES IN HI-RES - PART ONE

As many readers - but not all - will know, the biography of Jago Stone will be published as 'The Remarkable Life of Jago Stone' by Rob Donovan on October 1 this year. Unicorn PLG are my publishers. Their design team and I are working together to ensure that the book looks as good as it reads - and to this end I contacted recently all those who had sent me images of their Jago Stone paintings and which I then referenced and included as images within the text. Unicorn and I hoped that these contributors would respond and send me hi-res images of their Jago Stone art work which I could then add to the Dropbox to send to Unicorn. The higher the resolution, the finer the picture.

The response has been impressive. So many higher-resolution images have already arrived through cyber space; others have been promised. In this post, I focus on two of those who have gifted me hi-res images that will appear in the book - one English; one American - and give you - the reader - the opportunity to see those paintings. A taster for the book itself.


St Ives - Jago Stone (1982)


For the purposes of this post, I'll start with Phil Webb. On the morning of 27 August, last year in 2018 - just before we left for our Greek vacation - I received this email with two images attached:

'Hi Rob,

 Thought you might be interested in seeing these two painting. As I
 understand it Jago was going door to door in 1982 in Bradford On Avon,
 Wiltshire and my Mum bought the first painting that was painted in
 situ sitting in our garden. She then gave him a photograph I had taken

Sunday, 6 January 2019

JAGO STONE - THE AMERICAN CONNECTION - PART ELEVEN

And so it goes on. On the third day of January 2019, Harry Marshall from the United States (I'm not sure where in the States yet) left a Facebook message on the Jago Stone webpage, saying that he and his family had a painting by Jago.

'It is of "Little Bandy Legs" of Chacomb … we lived in this stone/thatch roof house for one year. I also have a newspaper article of him presenting a picture to the President (Gerald Ford) of Sulgrave manor. This comes from the Banbury Guardian paper.'

I replied saying how exciting it was to get news such as this - and then realised that Harry had already followed up with an image of his painting attached to another email. Here it is:


The inscription reads: 'Little Bandylegs - Chacombe - Northamptonshire - Specially painted for Marshall family, May 1974' - and it is signed 'Jago Stone 1974'


As I remark in Jago's biography, the American government knew the value of looking after its defence personnel overseas. Those who were not housed within the perimeters of Upper Heyford and